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Castello District

Arsenale

Arsenale

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Riva Degli Schiavoni

Riva Degli Schiavoni

Rio dell' Arsenale (2)

Rio dell' Arsenale

La Pieta

La Pieta

Rio dell' Arsenale

Rio dell' Arsenale

Ponte del Vin

Ponte del Vin

About Castello

Castello is the largest of Venice’s six sestieri. The neighbourhood is divided into various contrasting areas, some very touristy and others not at all. The frontier with San Marco is very popular among the visitors, since it is very close to the Doge’s Palace. However, Castello is also home to the Arsenale, which used to be the largest shipyard in Venice. This area is not very appealing, especially compared to the rest of Venice. Every odd-numbered year, the Venice Biennale takes place in the Arsenale.

A large part of the sestiere is occupied by the naval dockyard, but the rest of the neighbourhood is very authentic, where you will get an idea of how the locals live. It is also home to various landmarks.

www.introducingvenice.com

San Giorgio Maggiore

San Giorgio Maggiore (3)

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San Giorgio Maggiore (2)

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San Giorgio Maggiore Lighthouse

About San Giorgio Maggiore

San Giorgio Maggiore is one of the most photographed basilicas in Venice. The travellers standing in Piazza San Marco looking over the canal will be stunned by the temple’s façade with the gondolas swaying in the Lagoon in front of it.

www.introducingvenice.com

Rialto Bridge

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About The Rialto Bridge

The Rialto Bridge is the oldest bridge in Venice, and without a doubt, the most renowned. Every year millions of tourists cross it.

The Rialto Bridge is the oldest of the four bridges to cross the Grand Canal of Venice. It is also the most famous in Venice thanks to its peculiar history and design. For many years, the overpass was the most important financial centre in Venice.

The present Ponte di Rialto was built in stone between 1588 and 1591 by Antonio da Ponte to substitute a wooden bridge which had collapsed in two occasions and had been partially burnt down in 1310.

www.introducingvenice.com

Palazzo Ducale/Doge's Palace

Palazzo Ducale

Palazzo Ducale

Ponte Della Paglia

Ponte Della Paglia

New Prison

New Prison

Bridge Of Sighs

Bridge Of Sighs

Scala d'Oro (4)

Scala d'Oro

Scala d'Oro (2)

Scala d'Oro

Doges Palace Courtyard

Doges Palace Courtyard

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About The Doge’s Palace

The Doge’s Palace, in Italian Palazzo Ducale, is situated in Piazza San Marco. The Palazzo Ducale was originally a fortified castle founded between the tenth and eleventh centuries. The palace was partially destroyed by a fire and was rebuilt between 1172 and 1178, as was the Piazza San Marco. During this period, the Palazzo was used as a fortress and prison.

www.introducingvenice.com

Santa Maria Della Salute

Santa Maria Della Salute 2

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Santa Maria Della Salute 3

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About Santa María della Salute

Santa María della Salute is one of the most important religious buildings in Venice. Its striking dome is depicted in most of the city’s postcards.

Salute, as it is commonly known, was founded in 1631. The basilica was built to commemorate the end of a terrible outbreak of the plague that began in 1630, and killed a large portion of the Veneto population. It was dedicated to Our Lady of Health (Salute in Italian).

www.introducingvenice.com
About Venice

Venice is a city in northeastern Italy and the capital of the Veneto region. It is built on a group of 118 small islands[4] that are separated by canals and linked by over 400 bridges. The islands are in the shallow Venetian Lagoon, an enclosed bay lying between the mouths of the Po and the Piave rivers (more exactly between the Brenta and the Sile). In 2020, 258,685 people resided in the Comune di Venezia, of whom around 55,000 live in the historical city of Venice (centro storico). Together with Padua and Treviso, the city is included in the Padua-Treviso-Venice Metropolitan Area (PATREVE), which is considered a statistical metropolitan area, with a total population of 2.6 million.

Although no surviving historical records deal directly with the founding of Venice,[19] tradition and the available evidence have led several historians to agree that the original population of Venice consisted of refugees—from nearby Roman cities such as Padua, Aquileia, Treviso, Altino, and Concordia (modern Portogruaro), as well as from the undefended countryside—who were fleeing successive waves of Germanic and Hun invasions. This is further supported by the documentation on the so-called "apostolic families", the twelve founding families of Venice who elected the first doge, who in most cases trace their lineage back to Roman families. Some late Roman sources reveal the existence of fishermen, on the islands in the original marshy lagoons, who were referred to as incolae lacunae ("lagoon dwellers"). The traditional founding is identified with the dedication of the first church, that of San Giacomo on the islet of Rialto (Rivoalto, "High Shore")—said to have taken place at the stroke of noon on 25 March 421 (the Feast of the Annunciation).

en.wikipedia.org